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Travel Guide To KGZ

  • Kyrgyzstan
  • Bishkek
  • 105.4 km²
  • 11°C, Wind
  • KGZ Som
  • Kyrgyz, Russian
  • 0.995 million

General Information

Kyrgyzstan is situated in the east of Central Asia. Its neighbouring countries are Kazakhstan to the north, Uzbekistan to the west, Tadjikistan to the south and China to the East and South-East. The former Republic of the Soviet Union became independent in the year 1991 and since then is a democratic Presidential Republic. Bishkek, formerly called Frunze, is the capital with about 1 million inhabitants, the country as a whole has a population of about 5 million people and an area of 198.500 km².

As a result of its varied and turbulent history, Kyrgyzstan throughout the centuries became a multinational country with more than 80 nationalities dwelling there nowadays. The ethnic group of the Kyrgyz, traditionally nomads that still live as half-nomads (see also "Kyrgyz people and their traditions"), makes up only a bit more than 50% of the population. The two other important ethnic groups are Russians and Uzbeks, both with about 15 % of the population. The Russians came into the region during the 19 th century. The capital Bishkek, with a history of 125 years, is heavily influenced by the Russian lifestyle and Soviet architecture. This explains why that the second-biggest religious group in the mostly muslim country (83%) is Russian-orthodox.

The majority of Uzbek people live in the south of the country, close to the border of Uzbekistan. This part of the country is much more influenced by muslim traditions than the rest. The rest of the population living in Kyrgyzstan consists of European ethnic groups like Germans or Ukrains, muslim chinese people (Dungans), as well as Tatars and Uighurs.
Although there are so many different people living in the region, whose lifestyle and traditions sometimes differ a lot, they all have one thing in common: the typical Central Asian hospitality, which is a rare occasion in the western world. Never you will come across a yurt without being invited for a cup of national drink Kymyz and a snack, never you will be invited into the house of locals without facing a table, completely full of delicacies already before the main dish is served.

Gastronomy is not the only way where hospitality is shown. The warmth and openness of the people can be felt when you first get acquainted, and at the second meeting you're already considered as a family member!

Cities of Kyrgyzstan

Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan

Bishkek, the capital of the Republic of Kyrgyzstan, with a population of about 1 million, is situated in the north part of the country (Chui-Region). The city centre is heavily influenced by the Soviet era, so you can enjoy quite a number of typical soviet-style architecture (Philharmonia – concert hall, government building, Historic Museum, Monument for the Great War of the Native Country), and also modern monuments pointing out the traditional Kyrgyz culture (Monument of Manas, Monument of Independence, as well as many statues of Akyns, Manas’chi and local governors of different periods).

Issyk-Kul, Kyrgyzstan

Issyk-Kul is the largest lake in Kyrgyzstan, with about 180 km length, 70 km width and 668 m at the deepest point, (the average depth is about 300 meters). It is the world's second largest mountain lake – and the fifth deepest lake in the world. The lake has been held in high regard by the Kyrgyz who call it the “pearl of the Tien Shan ”. In 2004, the government declared the lake as the “property of the nation”.

Ala-Too Square, Bishkek

The country’s main square - Ala-Too Square is located in the center of Bishkek, as in any major city in the world. Literal translation from Kyrgyz language is “Motley Mountain” symbolizes the nature of the country, two thirds of which is represented by mountainous terrain. Ala-Too Square is a favorite place for the citizens to hold street festivities, festivals, meetings, etc.

At the perimeter of the square, there are the State Historical Museum of Kyrgyzstan, Oak Park with the Museum of Sculptures, St. Nicholas Church, and the People's Friendship Monument. Its center is occupied by a 10-meter bronze statue of the national epic hero Manas. 10 years ago, there stood the Monument to Lenin. The sculpture was moved to the Old Square, where it still attracts a lot of tourists who want to take pictures with the symbol of the Soviet era.

In addition, on the Ala-Too Square, there are also a monument to the famous Kyrgyz writer Chingiz Aitmatov and black-and-white monument in memory of the disorders of 2002 and 2010, claiming lives of dozens of people. A 45-meter high flagpole with the huge waving flag of Kyrgyzstan is installed on the square.

Burana Tower

Burana Tower is seven km. far from the city of Tokmok. It is an 11th century minaret, and one of the first buildings of such type in Central Asia. The original height of minaret was 45 meters. Today the tower is 24.6 meters high, the remaining part came down during an earthquake in the 15th century.

In the 10th to 12th centuries, Karakhanids khanate was a great feudal state of Central Asia and Kazakhstan. The founders, "karakhans", chigil tribes by birth, lived in the Tien-Shan and for a short time of the second half of the 10th century they conquered a large territory. One of the capitals of this state was Balasagun. In Karakhanids' time new towns and settlements were developing, the centers of big cities were improved and Moslem religious buildings were built in the town of Balasagun.

Burana tower, mausoleums and other buildings found after archeological excavations are the witnesses of that build up. The town's life declined slowly, people left it, the buildings fell apart and finally in the 15th century it ceased to exit.

Ala-Archa

One of the most visited places in Kyrgyzstan is Ala-Archa nature reserve. It is located 30 km from Bishkek in an area of 20,000 hectares, where there is everything: mountains, rivers, pine forests growing on the slopes of the mountains. It is these forests gave the name to the reserve. "Ala-Archa" means “variegated juniper” that fully characterizes the diversity of pine and spruce forests of the reserve. Every visitor discovers an amazing world of flora and fauna of Kyrgyzstan.

The reserve is a small valley inside the gorge, its ridges are covered with eternal ice, and the slopes are the finest spruce forests. The streams flow down from the glaciers on the slopes, by flow down streams of melt water, which then are converted into Ala-Archa River.

Ala-Archa River, of a total length of 76 km, originates from the glaciers in the northern slope of the Kyrgyz Ala-Too. It has several tributaries: the Ak-Sai, Top Karagai, Teke-Terre, Tuy-Suu Adygine, Jindi-Suu. The river flows through the reserve, the green meadows and slopes, covered with fir forests.
In 1976 Ala-Archa Kyrghyz State Park was created in Ala-Archa gorge, for the preservation of endangered rare species of animals, plants and the development of tourism and mountaineering. One of the main attractions of the reserve is a unique wildlife. Here you can see the snow leopard listed in the Red Book, and high in the valley lives a rare blue bird that the Kyrghyz call "a bird of happiness." Lots of other amazing flora and fauna forms live in the reserve, where hunting is strictly forbidden.

Another unique feature of the reserve is an alpine camp, located at an altitude of 2000 m above sea level. Such famous peaks as Semenov-Tyan-Shan peak(4875 m) and Korona Peak (4860 m) are also on the territory of the reserve. Semenov-Tyan-Shan Peak is the highest point of the ridge. Alpinists from all over the world gather here to conquer the summit.

Kashka – Suu

Kashka-suu ski resort is located 2,100 meters above sea level, 35 km from the capital of Kyrgyzstan - Bishkek.

Fresh air, stunning panorama of the the Great Kyrgyz Range and the Chuy valley, great tracks and the quality of service contribute to a good winter holiday in Kyrgyzstan.

Oak Park, Bishkek

Park named after Chingiz Aytmatov - the oldest park in Bishkek

Bishkek is a small but green city. There are over 20 parks, apart from the reserves located within the city limits. Amidst this entire shady splendor there stands out Oak Park - the central and the oldest park in Bishkek with more than a century-old history.

Oak Park is almost of the same age as the city itself. The first oak trees in the future park in the area of 2,5 ha were planted as far back as 1890 by Agricultural School students, directed by botanist A. Fetisov, who came to Pishpek (Bishkek old name) from Russia.

The oaks have been growing over many decades: under their thick foliage. Bishkek citizens and its guests take rest in summer, while their spreading branches are home to red nimble squirrels jumping on them. In winter, the Park alleys are covered with thick snow, and in autumn – swept with variegated deciduous leaves.

In 2010, Oak Park was renamed to Park named after Chingiz Aytmatov, however Bishkek residents still continue to call it Oak Park.

Oak Park is divided into two parts: the first is a garden to take walk amidst the mighty oaks, and the second is a cultural site, hosting monuments, sculptures and historic buildings. Thus the park has St. Nicholas Church – monument of Tsarist architecture. Today its building is used to host major vernissages and exhibitions of the Union of artists of Kyrgyzstan. Also, the park has the Russian Drama Theatre, near which the people take walk in waiting the beginning of evening performances.

Other attractions of the park is Twelve Bowls Fountain, an 11-meter granite obelisk in the mass graves of Red Army soldiers, killed in suppression of the Belovodskoye uprising of 1919, Eternal Flame in memory of those who died in the Great Patriotic War, Alley of Kyrgyzstan statesmen and the Sculpture Museum in the open air.

There is a story about the sculptures. The first sculptures appeared there in 1984. Mostly, they were metal, concrete and wooden sculptures brought by the participants of the all-Union Symposium of Sculptors, held in Frunze. All of them were collected in an open-air Museum of Sculptures which was opened five years later. Since then, the museum periodically is replenished with new exhibits. The last of them - the Kurmandjan Datka sculpture replacing the monument to Dzerzhinsky, was established in 2004.

Jailoo - summer pastures of Kyrgyz nomades

Nomadic cattle breeding was the main form of farm business of the Kyrgyz over three millenniums. Seasonal roaming was divided into winter (kyshtoo), spring (jazdoo), summer (jayloo) and autumn (kyzdoo) ones. As winter pastures, the valleys and intermontane hollows which were natural places for protection of herds and flocks from snowstorms and winds were used. Autumn and spring pastures were usually found at the holdings nearest to the hibernation, because of early thawing of a mantle of snow there. Summer pastures were located in intermontane valleys featured with heavy vegetative cover and natural water storages.

Jayloo, summer pastures of Kirgiz nomads were found in the piedmont and hilly regions of the country. The origin of this word as the tradition of roaming to summer pastures itself is dating back to the ancient history of the Turkic peoples. Nowadays the Kirgiz have 3,900 000 ha of their territory occupied by summer pastures.

Turkic transcription for jayloo is written as yaylag (yay means summer). In course of time the word was transformed to jayloo by the Kirgiz, to jaylau by the Kazakh and it was only the Turkmen who preserved the word yajak as it is.
It is an interesting fact that the nomads called winter pastures as kishlag (kish means winter). This term found its application and so up to date the countryside in Central Asia is called kishlak. The Kirgiz alone retained the traditional division into seasonal pastures. This tradition however is becoming obsolete in other countries of the region.

There are a lot of summer pastures – jayloo in the vastness of Kirgizia. So the tourists may visit them and live as nomads on the pastures in the Besh-Tash Gorge. The traditional jayloo to be visited by the tourists is situated in the Semyenov Gorge. Everybody can live there in traditional yurts (nomadic tents) and enjoy dishes of the Kirgiz cuisine.

The summer pastures can also be found around Lake Son-Kul, the second largest one in Kirgizia. This highland lake is located in the Tien Shan Mountains at the height of 3016m. It is located on a mountain plain surrounded by meadows (jayloo). This is one of the ancient places for summer cattle stripping which fact is confirmed by petroglyphic drawings found at the lakeside.

A jayloo means for the Kirgiz more than just a pasture for cattle stripping, this is a very ancient tradition which despite of the modern world is deeply respected and preserved in the culture of the Kirgiz people.

Shopping in Bishkek

Osh market

Locals and tourists shop here. You can try some local snacks and foods here or pick up snacks for hiking and traveling. It is divided into sections with the main food hall being as you enter straight from the gates of the bazaar. Wandering around the area you'll find army surplus gear, hardware, kitchen, clothing, shoes, even wool.

Bishkek park shopping mall

The Bishkek Park shopping center is currently one of the largest shopping centers in Bishkek.

Bishkek Park is a great place for shopping and entertainment. The complex has more than 100 boutiques and entertainment venues. The stores offer you the widest assortment of goods of various world and brands. The main brands are Ecco, Colin's, Mexx, Mango, Navigare, Beneton, Ramsey, Mavi, Terranova, Kira Plastinina.

Entertainment is also enough here: the cinema "Cinematics", "Bowling", an attraction for children "Fun Land", as well as more than 15 catering facilities with European and Eastern cuisine, underground parking (500 or more cars), numerous recreation areas, services for Visitors and the hypermarket «Yimpas»

Dordoi bazaar

One of the biggest bazaars in Central-Asia. People come here to do all kind of shopping.

The area is huge and everything is sold, mainly clothing and accessories though. Mostly Chinese and other Asian stuff coming from surrounding countries.Most of the area is very crowded of shoppers, goods removers and carts for buying all kind of snack food.

History and Ethnic Relations

Emergence of the Nation.The Kyrgyz people were originally settled in Siberia. Pressure from the Mongols forced their group to splinter into nomadic tribes and move to the region now known as Kyrgyzstan. Here they were subdued by the Kokandian Khanate, but there were many rebellions. The Kyrgyz allied with Russia as it expanded to the south. Russia then conquered the Kokands and ruled the Kyrgyz as a part of Russian Turkestan. The Kyrgyz rebelled in 1916 against the Russian peasant influx and the loss of grazing land. After the Communists took control, groups such as the Basmachi movement continued to fight for independence. Stalin's collective farms caused protests in the form of killing herds and fleeing to China.

National Identity.Until the advent of Communist control, the Kyrgyz were still a nomadic people made up of individual tribes. The idea of a Kyrgyz nation was fostered under Soviet rule. Kyrgyz traditions, national dress, and art were defined as distinct from their neighbors. Today people will name the Kyrgyz national hat (kalpak), instrument (komuz), sport (uulak), house (boz-ui), drink (kumyss), and foods. Stalin then intentionally drew borders inconsistent with the traditional locations of ethnic populations, leaving large numbers of ethnic Uzbeks and Turkmen within Kirghizia's borders. This was supposed to maintain a level of interethnic tension in the area, so that these closely related groups would not rise up against him.

Kyrgyzstan, like many of its neighbors, voted against independence when the Soviet Union collapsed. With no history as an independent nation, they have struggled with the loss of centralized government control. The people of Kyrgyzstan are, however, meeting these challenges, and Kyrgyzstan is held up as the most democratic and market-oriented country in Central Asia.

Ethnic Relations.Kyrgyzstan is an ethnically diverse country, which leads to tensions between and among different groups. Unlike in neighboring Uzbekistan, the Russian people are not vilified or considered morally corrupt. However, Russians claim there is discrimination by Kyrgyz people. In addition, smaller groups, such as the Uighours and the Dungans, complain of widespread discrimination.

The strongest ethnic tensions are felt between the Uzbeks and the Kyrgyz, particularly in the southern region of Osh. In 1990 riots and fighting broke out between these groups over competition for housing and job segregation. It is estimated that two hundred to a thousand people were killed in the fighting. Intergovernmental tension is also high, fueling ethnic conflicts.

Orientation

Identification.The nameqirqizorkyrgyzdates back to the eighth century. The Kyrgyz people originated in the Siberian region of the Yenisey Valley and traveled to the area of modern-day Kyrgyzstan in response to pressure from the Mongols. The Kyrgyz people believe that their name meanskirkkyz,(forty girls), and that they are descended from forty tribes. Today the majority of Kyrgyz people live in the Kyrgyz Republic, also known as Kyrgyzstan, but there are large populations living in China, Afghanistan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan. Kyrgyzstan was formerly the Kirghiz Soviet Socialist Republic, or Kirghizia.

Location and Geography.Kyrgyzstan has an area of 76,500 square miles (198,500 square kilometers). Its neighbors are China to the southeast, Kazakstan to the north, Tajikistan to the southwest, and Uzbekistan to the northwest. In addition, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan control two enclaves each within Kyrgyzstan's borders in the southern part of the country. Ninety-four percent of the land is mountainous, and only 20 percent of the land is arable. The valleys are densely populated along the few paved roads.

The capital, Bishkek, is in the north, near the Kazak border, where it was known as Frunze during the Soviet era. The country is divided into north and south by mountain ranges. Northern culture has been influenced by Russians, while southern culture has absorbed Uzbek traditions. The Naryn region in central Kyrgyzstan is relatively isolated, and it is here that the Kyrgyz culture is most "pure."

Demography.In 1998 the population of Kyrgyzstan was estimated at more than 4.5 million. Approximately 52.4 percent of the inhabitants are ethnically Kyrgyz. Ethnic Russians (22.5 percent) and Uzbeks (12.6 percent) make up the largest minorities. Many smaller groups, including Ukrainians, Germans, Dungans, Kazaks, Tajiks, Uighours, Koreans, and Chinese, make up the remainder. Many Kyrgyzstan-born Germans and Russians emigrated after the fall of the Soviet Union, but due to government efforts, Russian emigration has slowed. The Kyrgyz have a high birth rate, and have become the ethnic majority since independence.

Linguistic Affiliation.Kyrgyz is a Turkic language, most closely related to Kazak. Kyrgyz ismutually intelligible with both Kazak and Uzbek. Northern pronunciation varies from southern and has more Russian loanwords. Many Uzbek loanwords are used in the south.

Kyrgyz was originally written in Arabic script, but Soviet policy changed its alphabet first to Latin and then to a modified Cyrillic. After independence the Kyrgyz government discussed returning to the Latin alphabet, but this transition has not taken place. In 2000 Russian was adopted as an official national language. It is still commonly used as the language of business, and many ethnic Russians cannot speak Kyrgyz. All children study Kyrgyz, Russian, and English in school.

 

Cultural life in Bishkek - Theaters and Concert Halls

Historically, the Kyrgyz dramatic art is closely intertwined with folk ritual culture, including the arts of akyns-improvisers, storytellers-manaschi, kuuduls (folk comedians), etc.

Their performances, at the time, comprised some elements of actor’s art (including plastic, gestures, voice and intonation). The akyn aytyshy (poetry competitions) and speech-wit comedian performances, held at various celebrations, were added with musical numbers. All together, it could be called the first Kyrgyz folk theater.

Before the October Revolution, Kyrgyzstan had no professional theaters and concert halls, in the meaning, we know them today. However, the great popularity of folk arts, including that of storytellers of “Manas” epic, komuz players, kyyakists, akyns-improvisers and kuuduls have necessitated their foundation.

Currently, Bishkek has: the Kyrgyz National Academic Opera and Ballet Theater named after A. Maldybaev, State National Academic Drama Theater named after T. Abdumomunov, State Academic Russian Drama Theater named after N. Krupskaya, State Theater of Young Spectators, Kyrgyz State Circus, Bishkek City Drama Theater, Republican Puppet Theatre, Kyrgyz National Philharmonic named after T. Satylganov.

The Philharmonic building has two concert halls, which also hosts concerts of Kyrgyz classical, traditional and popular music, including various show programs of local and touring showbiz stars.

Bar & Restaurant in Bishkek

Dolce Vita Pizza

Fire and Ice

Aria

Promzona

12 Bar

Sierra Coffee

Dragon's Den

Kafe Coffee

Sweet 60s

Golden Bull

Watari

Cyclone Italian Restaurants

Metro Pub

Shao Lin GQ Exclusive night club

Faiza

Retro Metro

Buddha Bar

Edgar

Fakir

 

 

Addresses of Bishkek Theaters and Concert Halls

Kyrgyz National Academic Opera and Ballet Theater named after A. Maldybaev
167, Abdyrahmonov st., tel. (0312) 66-18-41

State National Academic Drama Theater named after T. Abdumomunov
273, Panfilov st. behind the government building, tel. 66-58-02, 21-69-58

State Academic Russian Drama Theater named after N. Krupskaya
122, Tynystanov st., Dubovy Park, tel. 66-20-32, 62-15-71

Kyrgyz State Theater of Young Spectators named after Baken Kadykeyev
230, Abdrakhmanov st. tel. +996 312 05/27/69

Kyrgyz State Circus
119, Jumabek st. tel. 966 (312) 28-16-31

Bishkek City Drama Theatre
242, Ogonbaev st., tel. 66-54-24

Republican Puppet Theatre
230/a, Yusuf Abdrakhmanov st., tel. 06.17.67

Kyrgyz National Philharmonic named after T.Satylganov
253, Chuy ave, tel. 21-22-62, 21-22-35

Conservatory
115, Dzhantoshev st., tel. 996 (312) 25.02.57

  • Kyrgyzstan
  • Bishkek
  • 105.4 km²
  • 11°C, Wind
  • KGZ Som
  • Kyrgyz, Russian
  • 0.995 million

General Information

Kyrgyzstan is situated in the east of Central Asia. Its neighbouring countries are Kazakhstan to the north, Uzbekistan to the west, Tadjikistan to the south and China to the East and South-East. The former Republic of the Soviet Union became independent in the year 1991 and since then is a democratic Presidential Republic. Bishkek, formerly called Frunze, is the capital with about 1 million inhabitants, the country as a whole has a population of about 5 million people and an area of 198.500 km².

As a result of its varied and turbulent history, Kyrgyzstan throughout the centuries became a multinational country with more than 80 nationalities dwelling there nowadays. The ethnic group of the Kyrgyz, traditionally nomads that still live as half-nomads (see also “Kyrgyz people and their traditions”), makes up only a bit more than 50% of the population. The two other important ethnic groups are Russians and Uzbeks, both with about 15 % of the population. The Russians came into the region during the 19 th century. The capital Bishkek, with a history of 125 years, is heavily influenced by the Russian lifestyle and Soviet architecture. This explains why that the second-biggest religious group in the mostly muslim country (83%) is Russian-orthodox.

The majority of Uzbek people live in the south of the country, close to the border of Uzbekistan. This part of the country is much more influenced by muslim traditions than the rest. The rest of the population living in Kyrgyzstan consists of European ethnic groups like Germans or Ukrains, muslim chinese people (Dungans), as well as Tatars and Uighurs.
Although there are so many different people living in the region, whose lifestyle and traditions sometimes differ a lot, they all have one thing in common: the typical Central Asian hospitality, which is a rare occasion in the western world. Never you will come across a yurt without being invited for a cup of national drink Kymyz and a snack, never you will be invited into the house of locals without facing a table, completely full of delicacies already before the main dish is served.

Gastronomy is not the only way where hospitality is shown. The warmth and openness of the people can be felt when you first get acquainted, and at the second meeting you’re already considered as a family member!

Cities of Kyrgyzstan

Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan

Bishkek, the capital of the Republic of Kyrgyzstan, with a population of about 1 million, is situated in the north part of the country (Chui-Region). The city centre is heavily influenced by the Soviet era, so you can enjoy quite a number of typical soviet-style architecture (Philharmonia – concert hall, government building, Historic Museum, Monument for the Great War of the Native Country), and also modern monuments pointing out the traditional Kyrgyz culture (Monument of Manas, Monument of Independence, as well as many statues of Akyns, Manas’chi and local governors of different periods).

Issyk-Kul, Kyrgyzstan

Issyk-Kul is the largest lake in Kyrgyzstan, with about 180 km length, 70 km width and 668 m at the deepest point, (the average depth is about 300 meters). It is the world’s second largest mountain lake – and the fifth deepest lake in the world. The lake has been held in high regard by the Kyrgyz who call it the “pearl of the Tien Shan ”. In 2004, the government declared the lake as the “property of the nation”.

History and Ethnic Relations

Emergence of the Nation.The Kyrgyz people were originally settled in Siberia. Pressure from the Mongols forced their group to splinter into nomadic tribes and move to the region now known as Kyrgyzstan. Here they were subdued by the Kokandian Khanate, but there were many rebellions. The Kyrgyz allied with Russia as it expanded to the south. Russia then conquered the Kokands and ruled the Kyrgyz as a part of Russian Turkestan. The Kyrgyz rebelled in 1916 against the Russian peasant influx and the loss of grazing land. After the Communists took control, groups such as the Basmachi movement continued to fight for independence. Stalin’s collective farms caused protests in the form of killing herds and fleeing to China.

National Identity.Until the advent of Communist control, the Kyrgyz were still a nomadic people made up of individual tribes. The idea of a Kyrgyz nation was fostered under Soviet rule. Kyrgyz traditions, national dress, and art were defined as distinct from their neighbors. Today people will name the Kyrgyz national hat (kalpak), instrument (komuz), sport (uulak), house (boz-ui), drink (kumyss), and foods. Stalin then intentionally drew borders inconsistent with the traditional locations of ethnic populations, leaving large numbers of ethnic Uzbeks and Turkmen within Kirghizia’s borders. This was supposed to maintain a level of interethnic tension in the area, so that these closely related groups would not rise up against him.

Kyrgyzstan, like many of its neighbors, voted against independence when the Soviet Union collapsed. With no history as an independent nation, they have struggled with the loss of centralized government control. The people of Kyrgyzstan are, however, meeting these challenges, and Kyrgyzstan is held up as the most democratic and market-oriented country in Central Asia.

Ethnic Relations.Kyrgyzstan is an ethnically diverse country, which leads to tensions between and among different groups. Unlike in neighboring Uzbekistan, the Russian people are not vilified or considered morally corrupt. However, Russians claim there is discrimination by Kyrgyz people. In addition, smaller groups, such as the Uighours and the Dungans, complain of widespread discrimination.

The strongest ethnic tensions are felt between the Uzbeks and the Kyrgyz, particularly in the southern region of Osh. In 1990 riots and fighting broke out between these groups over competition for housing and job segregation. It is estimated that two hundred to a thousand people were killed in the fighting. Intergovernmental tension is also high, fueling ethnic conflicts.

Orientation

Identification.The nameqirqizorkyrgyzdates back to the eighth century. The Kyrgyz people originated in the Siberian region of the Yenisey Valley and traveled to the area of modern-day Kyrgyzstan in response to pressure from the Mongols. The Kyrgyz people believe that their name meanskirkkyz,(forty girls), and that they are descended from forty tribes. Today the majority of Kyrgyz people live in the Kyrgyz Republic, also known as Kyrgyzstan, but there are large populations living in China, Afghanistan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan. Kyrgyzstan was formerly the Kirghiz Soviet Socialist Republic, or Kirghizia.

Location and Geography.Kyrgyzstan has an area of 76,500 square miles (198,500 square kilometers). Its neighbors are China to the southeast, Kazakstan to the north, Tajikistan to the southwest, and Uzbekistan to the northwest. In addition, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan control two enclaves each within Kyrgyzstan’s borders in the southern part of the country. Ninety-four percent of the land is mountainous, and only 20 percent of the land is arable. The valleys are densely populated along the few paved roads.

The capital, Bishkek, is in the north, near the Kazak border, where it was known as Frunze during the Soviet era. The country is divided into north and south by mountain ranges. Northern culture has been influenced by Russians, while southern culture has absorbed Uzbek traditions. The Naryn region in central Kyrgyzstan is relatively isolated, and it is here that the Kyrgyz culture is most “pure.”

Demography.In 1998 the population of Kyrgyzstan was estimated at more than 4.5 million. Approximately 52.4 percent of the inhabitants are ethnically Kyrgyz. Ethnic Russians (22.5 percent) and Uzbeks (12.6 percent) make up the largest minorities. Many smaller groups, including Ukrainians, Germans, Dungans, Kazaks, Tajiks, Uighours, Koreans, and Chinese, make up the remainder. Many Kyrgyzstan-born Germans and Russians emigrated after the fall of the Soviet Union, but due to government efforts, Russian emigration has slowed. The Kyrgyz have a high birth rate, and have become the ethnic majority since independence.

Linguistic Affiliation.Kyrgyz is a Turkic language, most closely related to Kazak. Kyrgyz ismutually intelligible with both Kazak and Uzbek. Northern pronunciation varies from southern and has more Russian loanwords. Many Uzbek loanwords are used in the south.

Kyrgyz was originally written in Arabic script, but Soviet policy changed its alphabet first to Latin and then to a modified Cyrillic. After independence the Kyrgyz government discussed returning to the Latin alphabet, but this transition has not taken place. In 2000 Russian was adopted as an official national language. It is still commonly used as the language of business, and many ethnic Russians cannot speak Kyrgyz. All children study Kyrgyz, Russian, and English in school.

 

Cultural life in Bishkek – Theaters and Concert Halls

Historically, the Kyrgyz dramatic art is closely intertwined with folk ritual culture, including the arts of akyns-improvisers, storytellers-manaschi, kuuduls (folk comedians), etc.

Their performances, at the time, comprised some elements of actor’s art (including plastic, gestures, voice and intonation). The akyn aytyshy (poetry competitions) and speech-wit comedian performances, held at various celebrations, were added with musical numbers. All together, it could be called the first Kyrgyz folk theater.

Before the October Revolution, Kyrgyzstan had no professional theaters and concert halls, in the meaning, we know them today. However, the great popularity of folk arts, including that of storytellers of “Manas” epic, komuz players, kyyakists, akyns-improvisers and kuuduls have necessitated their foundation.

Currently, Bishkek has: the Kyrgyz National Academic Opera and Ballet Theater named after A. Maldybaev, State National Academic Drama Theater named after T. Abdumomunov, State Academic Russian Drama Theater named after N. Krupskaya, State Theater of Young Spectators, Kyrgyz State Circus, Bishkek City Drama Theater, Republican Puppet Theatre, Kyrgyz National Philharmonic named after T. Satylganov.

The Philharmonic building has two concert halls, which also hosts concerts of Kyrgyz classical, traditional and popular music, including various show programs of local and touring showbiz stars.

Bar & Restaurant in Bishkek

Dolce Vita Pizza

Fire and Ice

Aria

Promzona

12 Bar

Sierra Coffee

Dragon’s Den

Kafe Coffee

Sweet 60s

Golden Bull

Watari

Cyclone Italian Restaurants

Metro Pub

Shao Lin GQ Exclusive night club

Faiza

Retro Metro

Buddha Bar

Edgar

Fakir

 

 

Addresses of Bishkek Theaters and Concert Halls

Kyrgyz National Academic Opera and Ballet Theater named after A. Maldybaev
167, Abdyrahmonov st., tel. (0312) 66-18-41

State National Academic Drama Theater named after T. Abdumomunov
273, Panfilov st. behind the government building, tel. 66-58-02, 21-69-58

State Academic Russian Drama Theater named after N. Krupskaya
122, Tynystanov st., Dubovy Park, tel. 66-20-32, 62-15-71

Kyrgyz State Theater of Young Spectators named after Baken Kadykeyev
230, Abdrakhmanov st. tel. +996 312 05/27/69

Kyrgyz State Circus
119, Jumabek st. tel. 966 (312) 28-16-31

Bishkek City Drama Theatre
242, Ogonbaev st., tel. 66-54-24

Republican Puppet Theatre
230/a, Yusuf Abdrakhmanov st., tel. 06.17.67

Kyrgyz National Philharmonic named after T.Satylganov
253, Chuy ave, tel. 21-22-62, 21-22-35

Conservatory
115, Dzhantoshev st., tel. 996 (312) 25.02.57

Ala-Too Square, Bishkek

The country’s main square – Ala-Too Square is located in the center of Bishkek, as in any major city in the world. Literal translation from Kyrgyz language is “Motley Mountain” symbolizes the nature of the country, two thirds of which is represented by mountainous terrain. Ala-Too Square is a favorite place for the citizens to hold street festivities, festivals, meetings, etc.

At the perimeter of the square, there are the State Historical Museum of Kyrgyzstan, Oak Park with the Museum of Sculptures, St. Nicholas Church, and the People’s Friendship Monument. Its center is occupied by a 10-meter bronze statue of the national epic hero Manas. 10 years ago, there stood the Monument to Lenin. The sculpture was moved to the Old Square, where it still attracts a lot of tourists who want to take pictures with the symbol of the Soviet era.

In addition, on the Ala-Too Square, there are also a monument to the famous Kyrgyz writer Chingiz Aitmatov and black-and-white monument in memory of the disorders of 2002 and 2010, claiming lives of dozens of people. A 45-meter high flagpole with the huge waving flag of Kyrgyzstan is installed on the square.

Burana Tower

Burana Tower is seven km. far from the city of Tokmok. It is an 11th century minaret, and one of the first buildings of such type in Central Asia. The original height of minaret was 45 meters. Today the tower is 24.6 meters high, the remaining part came down during an earthquake in the 15th century.

In the 10th to 12th centuries, Karakhanids khanate was a great feudal state of Central Asia and Kazakhstan. The founders, “karakhans”, chigil tribes by birth, lived in the Tien-Shan and for a short time of the second half of the 10th century they conquered a large territory. One of the capitals of this state was Balasagun. In Karakhanids’ time new towns and settlements were developing, the centers of big cities were improved and Moslem religious buildings were built in the town of Balasagun.

Burana tower, mausoleums and other buildings found after archeological excavations are the witnesses of that build up. The town’s life declined slowly, people left it, the buildings fell apart and finally in the 15th century it ceased to exit.

Ala-Archa

One of the most visited places in Kyrgyzstan is Ala-Archa nature reserve. It is located 30 km from Bishkek in an area of 20,000 hectares, where there is everything: mountains, rivers, pine forests growing on the slopes of the mountains. It is these forests gave the name to the reserve. “Ala-Archa” means “variegated juniper” that fully characterizes the diversity of pine and spruce forests of the reserve. Every visitor discovers an amazing world of flora and fauna of Kyrgyzstan.

The reserve is a small valley inside the gorge, its ridges are covered with eternal ice, and the slopes are the finest spruce forests. The streams flow down from the glaciers on the slopes, by flow down streams of melt water, which then are converted into Ala-Archa River.

Ala-Archa River, of a total length of 76 km, originates from the glaciers in the northern slope of the Kyrgyz Ala-Too. It has several tributaries: the Ak-Sai, Top Karagai, Teke-Terre, Tuy-Suu Adygine, Jindi-Suu. The river flows through the reserve, the green meadows and slopes, covered with fir forests.
In 1976 Ala-Archa Kyrghyz State Park was created in Ala-Archa gorge, for the preservation of endangered rare species of animals, plants and the development of tourism and mountaineering. One of the main attractions of the reserve is a unique wildlife. Here you can see the snow leopard listed in the Red Book, and high in the valley lives a rare blue bird that the Kyrghyz call “a bird of happiness.” Lots of other amazing flora and fauna forms live in the reserve, where hunting is strictly forbidden.

Another unique feature of the reserve is an alpine camp, located at an altitude of 2000 m above sea level. Such famous peaks as Semenov-Tyan-Shan peak(4875 m) and Korona Peak (4860 m) are also on the territory of the reserve. Semenov-Tyan-Shan Peak is the highest point of the ridge. Alpinists from all over the world gather here to conquer the summit.

Kashka – Suu

Kashka-suu ski resort is located 2,100 meters above sea level, 35 km from the capital of Kyrgyzstan – Bishkek.

Fresh air, stunning panorama of the the Great Kyrgyz Range and the Chuy valley, great tracks and the quality of service contribute to a good winter holiday in Kyrgyzstan.

Oak Park, Bishkek

Park named after Chingiz Aytmatov – the oldest park in Bishkek

Bishkek is a small but green city. There are over 20 parks, apart from the reserves located within the city limits. Amidst this entire shady splendor there stands out Oak Park – the central and the oldest park in Bishkek with more than a century-old history.

Oak Park is almost of the same age as the city itself. The first oak trees in the future park in the area of 2,5 ha were planted as far back as 1890 by Agricultural School students, directed by botanist A. Fetisov, who came to Pishpek (Bishkek old name) from Russia.

The oaks have been growing over many decades: under their thick foliage. Bishkek citizens and its guests take rest in summer, while their spreading branches are home to red nimble squirrels jumping on them. In winter, the Park alleys are covered with thick snow, and in autumn – swept with variegated deciduous leaves.

In 2010, Oak Park was renamed to Park named after Chingiz Aytmatov, however Bishkek residents still continue to call it Oak Park.

Oak Park is divided into two parts: the first is a garden to take walk amidst the mighty oaks, and the second is a cultural site, hosting monuments, sculptures and historic buildings. Thus the park has St. Nicholas Church – monument of Tsarist architecture. Today its building is used to host major vernissages and exhibitions of the Union of artists of Kyrgyzstan. Also, the park has the Russian Drama Theatre, near which the people take walk in waiting the beginning of evening performances.

Other attractions of the park is Twelve Bowls Fountain, an 11-meter granite obelisk in the mass graves of Red Army soldiers, killed in suppression of the Belovodskoye uprising of 1919, Eternal Flame in memory of those who died in the Great Patriotic War, Alley of Kyrgyzstan statesmen and the Sculpture Museum in the open air.

There is a story about the sculptures. The first sculptures appeared there in 1984. Mostly, they were metal, concrete and wooden sculptures brought by the participants of the all-Union Symposium of Sculptors, held in Frunze. All of them were collected in an open-air Museum of Sculptures which was opened five years later. Since then, the museum periodically is replenished with new exhibits. The last of them – the Kurmandjan Datka sculpture replacing the monument to Dzerzhinsky, was established in 2004.

Jailoo – summer pastures of Kyrgyz nomades

Nomadic cattle breeding was the main form of farm business of the Kyrgyz over three millenniums. Seasonal roaming was divided into winter (kyshtoo), spring (jazdoo), summer (jayloo) and autumn (kyzdoo) ones. As winter pastures, the valleys and intermontane hollows which were natural places for protection of herds and flocks from snowstorms and winds were used. Autumn and spring pastures were usually found at the holdings nearest to the hibernation, because of early thawing of a mantle of snow there. Summer pastures were located in intermontane valleys featured with heavy vegetative cover and natural water storages.

Jayloo, summer pastures of Kirgiz nomads were found in the piedmont and hilly regions of the country. The origin of this word as the tradition of roaming to summer pastures itself is dating back to the ancient history of the Turkic peoples. Nowadays the Kirgiz have 3,900 000 ha of their territory occupied by summer pastures.

Turkic transcription for jayloo is written as yaylag (yay means summer). In course of time the word was transformed to jayloo by the Kirgiz, to jaylau by the Kazakh and it was only the Turkmen who preserved the word yajak as it is.
It is an interesting fact that the nomads called winter pastures as kishlag (kish means winter). This term found its application and so up to date the countryside in Central Asia is called kishlak. The Kirgiz alone retained the traditional division into seasonal pastures. This tradition however is becoming obsolete in other countries of the region.

There are a lot of summer pastures – jayloo in the vastness of Kirgizia. So the tourists may visit them and live as nomads on the pastures in the Besh-Tash Gorge. The traditional jayloo to be visited by the tourists is situated in the Semyenov Gorge. Everybody can live there in traditional yurts (nomadic tents) and enjoy dishes of the Kirgiz cuisine.

The summer pastures can also be found around Lake Son-Kul, the second largest one in Kirgizia. This highland lake is located in the Tien Shan Mountains at the height of 3016m. It is located on a mountain plain surrounded by meadows (jayloo). This is one of the ancient places for summer cattle stripping which fact is confirmed by petroglyphic drawings found at the lakeside.

A jayloo means for the Kirgiz more than just a pasture for cattle stripping, this is a very ancient tradition which despite of the modern world is deeply respected and preserved in the culture of the Kirgiz people.

Shopping in Bishkek

Osh market

Locals and tourists shop here. You can try some local snacks and foods here or pick up snacks for hiking and traveling. It is divided into sections with the main food hall being as you enter straight from the gates of the bazaar. Wandering around the area you’ll find army surplus gear, hardware, kitchen, clothing, shoes, even wool.

Bishkek park shopping mall

The Bishkek Park shopping center is currently one of the largest shopping centers in Bishkek.

Bishkek Park is a great place for shopping and entertainment. The complex has more than 100 boutiques and entertainment venues. The stores offer you the widest assortment of goods of various world and brands. The main brands are Ecco, Colin’s, Mexx, Mango, Navigare, Beneton, Ramsey, Mavi, Terranova, Kira Plastinina.

Entertainment is also enough here: the cinema “Cinematics”, “Bowling”, an attraction for children “Fun Land”, as well as more than 15 catering facilities with European and Eastern cuisine, underground parking (500 or more cars), numerous recreation areas, services for Visitors and the hypermarket «Yimpas»

Dordoi bazaar

One of the biggest bazaars in Central-Asia. People come here to do all kind of shopping.

The area is huge and everything is sold, mainly clothing and accessories though. Mostly Chinese and other Asian stuff coming from surrounding countries.Most of the area is very crowded of shoppers, goods removers and carts for buying all kind of snack food.

Population

The country’s population is a little over 6 million. Since life is hard in the mountains, most of the
people live in the valleys. The largest ethnic group are Kyrgyz. They make up 72% of the
population (2017 estimate) and are spread throughout the country. The largest ethnic minorities
are Uzbeks (14.5%) concentrated in the south and Russians (9.0%) living mainly in the north.
There are also Dungans (1.9%), Uighurs (1.1%), Tajiks (1.1%), Kazakhs (0.7%), Ukrainians
(0.5%) and other smaller ethnic minorities, including Germans.

Government

Kyrgyzstan is a parliamentary republic. The parliament, Jogorku Kengesh (“Supreme Council’),
is unicameral, with 120 seats elected by popular vote for five-year terms. The president is
elected by popular vote for only one six-year term.

Administrative Divisions

The country has seven provinces (Batken, Jalal-Abad,
Issyk-Kul, Naryn, Osh, Talas, and Chuy), two cities each
equal to a province (Bishkek and Osh) and 40 districts in
the provinces. There are 22 cities and 429 rural
administrative offices.
The capital and the largest city is Bishkek, formerly
known as Pishpek and Frunze, with a population of
874,400.
Languages
The official languages are Kyrgyz and Russian. Uzbek
and Tajik are also widely spoken. Russian is used as the
lingua franca. There are about 30,000 second-language English speakers in the country.
Currency
The currency used in Kyrgyzstan is the som (KGS). One som has 100 tyiyns. Banks and
currency exchange offices are available in all the cities. One US dollar is equal to about 68.5
soms (2017 rate).
Religion
Eighty percent of the population professes Islam (Sunni). Around 17% (mainly ethnic Russians
and Ukrainians) follow Russian Orthodox Christianity, and 3% are adherents of other religions.
Time Zone
UTC/GMT+6 hours; no daylight saving time for 2017
Electricity
220V/50Hz; CEE 7 standards two-pin plugs and sockets
Climate

The country’s terrain and location will allow for
experiencing almost all types of climate: seaside,
subtropical, temperate, dry continental, and even
subpolar. The temperatures vary as to region. In winter, it
is around -8°C in the lowlands and around -27°C in the
mountains. In summer, however, the temperature is
almost the same in the highlands and lowlands – it is
around +26°C, with up to +40°C around the southern city
of Osh, Fergana Valley, and -10°C around the highest
mountain peaks. The temperatures around Issyk-Kul
Lake do not vary significantly by season and are quite

comfortable: it is around +2°C in winter (The lake does not freeze in winter, which even its name
meaning “hot lake” is indicative of.) and +18-25°C in summer. The precipitation varies from
2,000mm per year in the mountains to around 100mm per year on the west bank of Issyk-Kul
Lake. The air in the country is mainly dry. The yearly number of sunny days is quite large – it is
247.

How to Dress in Kyrgyzstan

The best summer clothes to wear in the country will be T-
shirts, light shirts, light and loose trousers, shorts, or
sundresses. Clothes made of cotton, or having most of
cotton, will feel ideal – cotton breathes and absorbs sweat
better than synthetics. Do not forget that white garments
will take less solar heat. However, the humidity is low in
Kyrgyzstan, so high temperatures are quite bearable
unless you are in the south of the country in mid-summer.
Remember that your footwear must be comfortable, light
and strong, since you will have to walk over rough ground
surfaces at times. Light sandals will be great to wear in
the cities. Sunglasses, light headwear and sunblock lotion

should also be kept handy in summer.
There are no dressing style limits in the local culture. However, while visiting religious sites,
women should wear loose garments covering most of their arms and legs, and of course the
cleavage. Headscarves will also be advisable to put on. Note that you will have to take off your
shoes while entering traditional Kyrgyz homes and some of the sacred places where people
pray.
If you are planning to go to the mountains, it is quite another dressing issue. Note that it is much
colder in the mountains in summer, especially at nighttime, and the weather is rather
changeable up there.

Kyrgyz Cuisine

Although you can sample Uzbek, Russian, Uighur,
Dungan and other dishes in almost every part of modern
Kyrgyzstan, the Kyrgyz, of course, have their own
traditional cuisine. However, influenced by the nomadic
past of the people, their menu is not so diverse as the
ones of the peoples with sedentary heritage. There are no
Kyrgyz chicken recipes, for instance, for growing poultry
would have required sedentariness, but there are many
traditional Kyrgyz cattle meat dishes cooked to preserve
them for a long time.
Among the traditional Kyrgyz recipes stand out various
horsemeat sausages. Chuchuk is probably the most outstanding of them. It is a high-fat
horsemeat smoked sausage with a piquant taste. They use horsemeat for cooking a variety of
other dishes, such as karyn, which is cold horse stomach slices. Very popular
is beshbarmak (also spelled as beshbarmaq) – boiled and shredded meat with noodles in broth.
The Kyrgyz have long been cooking Uzbek, Tajik, Uighur and other neighboring peoples’
signature dishes, such as pilaf, laghman noodles (in gravy with meat pieces and
vegetables), manti and chuchpara (chuchvara) dumplings. Since the times of the Great Silk

Road Central Asian nomadic and sedentary cultures, including cuisines, have always been
mixing up, complementing each other.
The local people very much love and often eat honey. Honey with local flatbreads is a common
morning meal in the country.
There are a lot of most delicious fruits in Kyrgyzstan in summer and autumn. The apples from
Issyk-Kul Lake orchards, for instance, rank among of the world’s best. When it comes to
vegetables, the Kyrgyz like pumpkin very much.
What Kyrgyz cuisine is also notable for is a wide variety of fizzy fermented milk and cereal
beverages. First, it is kymyz, fermented mare’s milk, slightly alcoholic – the signature drink of
Eurasian nomads. Very popular in the country is maksym – grounded grains, water or milk,
flour, all fermented. Ayran – a mixture of fermented milk, salt and water – is also very common in
Kyrgyzstan. Jarma, like maksym, is made from ground grains and mixed with ayran. Chalap is
similar to ayran, and is known as Tan in the market. All these beverages are made almost
everywhere in Kyrgyzstan. You can buy them from the local bazaars, stores and even at the
roadsides.
Traditionally, Kyrgyz families have their meals at a dasturkhan – a large cloth spread on the
floor. If you visit a Kyrgyz home, invited to dinner, you must take the food with the right hand
and put your legs away from the dasturkhan. Try not to sneeze, if you can. They do not think
doing so while having meals is appropriate either.

Cost of Food in Kyrgyzstan

Generally, the menus in Kyrgyzstan’s cafes and restaurants are never expensive. A lunch and
a dinner, for instance, will cost around 10 USD and 20 USD respectively. However, in the
capital, there is a number of luxury restaurants where you will have to pay over 10 USD for a
cup of coffee. Most cafes and restaurants in Kyrgyzstan have traditional Kyrgyz, Uzbek, Uighur
and Russian menus.

Clearing Customs

According to the customs regulations of Kyrgyzstan, bringing into the country firearms,
ammunition, narcotics and printed material with the content threatening the state’s constitutional
system is prohibited. Regardless of citizenship, a person can bring in as much cash as they can,
on condition that the sum they can take out of the country must not exceed the sum they
brought in as per their arrival customs declaration (to be kept till their departure from the
country).
You can bring into the country valuables, devices and equipment that are worth 5,000 USD at
the most, and such objects are to be listed in the arrival customs declaration as well. If you do
not have any of them as per your arrival customs declaration while leaving the country, you will
have to pay an import duty on such “missing” objects.
You are allowed to bring into the country 1,000 cigarettes, 2 liters of wine and 1.5 liters of strong
alcoholic drinks at the most. The quantity of cosmetics allowed to bring in cannot exceed one
adequate for your personal use.

Currencies in Kyrgyzstan

The national currency of Kyrgyzstan is the som (KGS;
also transliterated as sum, soum). The values of the
banknotes used currently are 1, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200,
500, 1000, and 5000. All the transactions in the country
must be conducted in soms. You can exchange your
money in the local banks, which are open mainly from

9.00 to 17.00 except weekends, and official currency exchange offices, some of which work
round the clock.
Note that the exchange rates may differ slightly as to location, and the rate in the capital is
always better than outside it. Note also that they may not accept badly worn or old banknotes,
as well as banknotes with defects, bad folds and scribbles.
We do not recommend that you exchange money through individual exchange dealers at the
bazaars: there is a risk of falling prey to cheaters or be arrested red-handed if you go for their
illegal services.
International banks cards are accepted only in some hotels, banks and shopping centers
in Bishkek.

Photographing and Videoing Sites

In Kyrgyzstan, people are allowed to photograph and video almost anything except for airports
and military facilities. If you want to photograph or video strangers, especially close up, you
should do so with their permission.

Souvenirs

You will most probably want to buy some traditional
Kyrghyz handicrafts – as memory tokens or gifts for
friends. Besides handmade carpets and rugs, as well as
wooden objects decorated with carvings, which are quite
widespread in Central Asian countries, they make
impressive felt items in Kyrgyzstan – also part of the
country’s nomadic past heritage.
Standing out among them are a wide variety of scale
models of traditional Kyrgyz yurts (collapsible dwelling
structures of Asian nomads), teapot covers, traditional felt
hats, toys, and felt slippers. A set of traditional Kyrgyz

drinking bowls with characteristic designs will also be a great thing to buy.

National holidays in Kyrgyzstan

• 1 st  January – New Year
• 7 th  January – Orthodox Christmas
• 8 th  January – Orozo Ayt (Yid al-Fitr, Muslim Holiday of End-of- Fasting)
• 8 th  March – International Women’s Day
• 21 st  March – Nooruz (Day of Vernal Equinox)
• 26 th  March – Kurman Ayt (Yil al-Adhah, Muslim Holiday of Sacrifice)
• 1 st  May – International Labour Day
• 5 th  May – Constitution Day
• 9 th  May – Victory Day
• 31 st  August – Independence Day.

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  • All Lunches at Indian Restaurant
  • All transfers as per program
  • Sightseeing tour of Bishkek
  • English speaking guide assistance
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